Crystal Lake, IL Dentist
77 E. Crystal Lake Avenue
Crystal Lake, IL 60014

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Some patients think that just because you can't see your back molars, it's OK to lose them.  That it's a small thing to remove a heavily decayed or damage molar.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  When a molar is lost: 

1) The remaining teeth shift into the space left behind, increasing the chance you'll get jaw pain, headaches, broke or cracked teeth and severe wear. 

2) Because your jawbone is no longer stimiulated, it will recede, causing a sunken aged appearance.

3) Favorite foods go by the wayside as chewing becomes more difficult.  

Our primary mission is prevention, but if one or more of your molars needs support, we can help!  There are many options available that can fit in your budget. The most affordable and common option to replace a back molar is with a bridge or crown. While both are effective, there are some downsides that come with these options. For example, you won’t have the same biting force or appearance of a natural tooth. Plus, your surrounding teeth are more prone to tooth decay and you’ll likely need to have a replacement bridge or crown made in the future.  

Dental Implants are the best option to replace a back molar. Implants look and function just as your natural teeth. You’ll have a permanent solution to tooth loss using an implant that closely mimics natural teeth. You’ll resolve all of the complications and risks associated with a missing tooth to protect your oral health and quality of life.

 

According to an article in Newsweek this month, drinking sugary soda could raise the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Scientists at Columbia University of New York studied rates of Alzheimer’s disease in older people and found a link between sugary drinks and the neurodegenerative condition that an estimated 5.7 million Americans currently deal with. However, more research is needed to prove whether Alzheimer’s is caused by these drinks. 

The team presented their findings at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2018 in Chicago on Monday. As there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, researchers are racing to find ways to not only ease the symptoms such as memory loss and cognitive decline, but also prevent the condition from developing in the first place. 

Past studies indicate type 2 diabetes, which can be triggered by consuming excess sugar, is a risk factor for dementia.

To test their hypothesis, the researchers studied 2,226 elderly people who lived in New York City over the course of seven years. The researchers documented the food and drink the participants consumed that contained added sugar, including in soft drinks, fruit drinks and food. Of the total participants, some 429 developed Alzheimer’s disease.

The scientists found those who ate 30.3 grams of added sugar per day were 33 percent more likely to develop Alzheimer’s compared with those who consumed 5.8 grams per day.

They found similar patterns in those who drank a soda every other day, at 20 grams sugar on average, compared to those who consumed 1 can every 100 days; 23 grams of sugar per day in punch or fruit drinks compared with 0.4 grams; and 2.5 teaspoons of sugar added to food or drinks per day compared with no added sugar.

When all there categories were compared, drinking sugary soda was “significantly” associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer’s when compared to other sweetened products, the authors said.

YOUR TOOTHBRUSH:

For the most hygienic and effective cleaning, experts recommend starting fresh every three to four months or when you notice the bristles becoming frayed. In addition, you should consider getting a new toothbrush sooner if you have been sick, especially if the toothbrush is stored close to other toothbrushes.    

SHOWER LOOFAH:

The synthetic mesh you use to get your body clean can also be a breeding ground for bacteria.  Hanging it to drip-dry will help, but you'll still want to swap in a fresh one every two months.  

KITCHEN SPONGE:

Microbiologists have found that kitchen sponges can harbor 82 billion bacteria per cubic inch - and the strongest bugs survived even after the sponge was microwaved.  Toss and replace every one to two weeks.  Remember sponges can also be placed in dishwasher to help keep them clean and fresh.  

Artificial sweeteners are everywhere, but the jury is still out on whether these chemicals are harmless. Also called nonnutritive sweeteners, these can be synthetic, such as saccharin and aspartame, or naturally derived, such as stevia. 

However, recent medical studies suggest that these sweeteners may be contributing to chronic diabetes and cardiovascular diseases as well.

The key to these virtually calorie-free sweeteners is that they are not broken down during digestion into natural sugars such as glucose, fructose and galactose, which are then either used for energy or converted into fat.

Theoretically, these sweeteners should be a better choice than sugar for diabetics.  However, there is growing evidence over the past decade that these sweeteners can alter healthy metabolic processes in other ways, specifically in the gut.

Long-term use of these sweeteners has been associated with a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes. Sweeteners have also been shown to change brain activity associated with eating sweet foods. Researchers have hypothesized that this could lead diet soda drinkers to compensate for the lack of pleasure they now derive from the drink by increasing their consumption of all foods, not just soda.

Together these cellular and brain studies may explain why people who consume sweeteners still have a higher risk of obesity than individuals who don’t consume these products.

As this debate on the pros and cons of these sugar substitutes rages on, we must view these behavioral studies with a grain of salt (or sugar) because many diet soda drinkers are already overweight and may turn to low-calorie drinks, making it look as though the diet sodas are causing their weight gain.

These findings signal that consumers and health practitioners all need to check our assumptions about the health benefits of these products. Sweeteners are everywhere, from beverages to salad dressing, from cookies to yogurt, and we must recognize that there is no guarantee that these chemicals won’t increase the burden of metabolic diseases in the future.

School may be out for summer, but your child’s best teacher is working year-round: You!

Leading by example — especially when it comes to establishing healthy habits like brushingcleaning between your teeth and seeing your dentist — can make a big difference in the health and happiness of your entire family.

That’s why we are celebrating now through June 30, Oral Health Month: "Share More Time, Share More Smiles"  campaign.  This endeavor hopes to decrease poor oral health outcomes by inspiring families to share more time, moments and smiles together, as a means of educating them about the importance of proper oral care. 

We're excited about Oral Health Month, which focuses on the importance of prevention and the impact of good dental health on overall health. Good habits — like brushing for two minutes, twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and visiting a dentist regularly — helps keep smiles healthy.  Leading by example is one of the best ways to teach these healthy habits.

Colgate, in collaboration with the ADA, has developed this campaign to provide bilingual oral health education materials such as sharable infographic, pamphlets and resources on colgate.com/sonrisas.

Bilingual videos, articles, downloadable family activities will also be available on the ADA’s site MouthHealthy.org/OralHealthMonth





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