Crystal Lake, IL Dentist
77 E. Crystal Lake Avenue
Crystal Lake, IL 60014

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Posts for: July, 2018

YOUR TOOTHBRUSH:

For the most hygienic and effective cleaning, experts recommend starting fresh every three to four months or when you notice the bristles becoming frayed. In addition, you should consider getting a new toothbrush sooner if you have been sick, especially if the toothbrush is stored close to other toothbrushes.    

SHOWER LOOFAH:

The synthetic mesh you use to get your body clean can also be a breeding ground for bacteria.  Hanging it to drip-dry will help, but you'll still want to swap in a fresh one every two months.  

KITCHEN SPONGE:

Microbiologists have found that kitchen sponges can harbor 82 billion bacteria per cubic inch - and the strongest bugs survived even after the sponge was microwaved.  Toss and replace every one to two weeks.  Remember sponges can also be placed in dishwasher to help keep them clean and fresh.  


Artificial sweeteners are everywhere, but the jury is still out on whether these chemicals are harmless. Also called nonnutritive sweeteners, these can be synthetic, such as saccharin and aspartame, or naturally derived, such as stevia. 

However, recent medical studies suggest that these sweeteners may be contributing to chronic diabetes and cardiovascular diseases as well.

The key to these virtually calorie-free sweeteners is that they are not broken down during digestion into natural sugars such as glucose, fructose and galactose, which are then either used for energy or converted into fat.

Theoretically, these sweeteners should be a better choice than sugar for diabetics.  However, there is growing evidence over the past decade that these sweeteners can alter healthy metabolic processes in other ways, specifically in the gut.

Long-term use of these sweeteners has been associated with a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes. Sweeteners have also been shown to change brain activity associated with eating sweet foods. Researchers have hypothesized that this could lead diet soda drinkers to compensate for the lack of pleasure they now derive from the drink by increasing their consumption of all foods, not just soda.

Together these cellular and brain studies may explain why people who consume sweeteners still have a higher risk of obesity than individuals who don’t consume these products.

As this debate on the pros and cons of these sugar substitutes rages on, we must view these behavioral studies with a grain of salt (or sugar) because many diet soda drinkers are already overweight and may turn to low-calorie drinks, making it look as though the diet sodas are causing their weight gain.

These findings signal that consumers and health practitioners all need to check our assumptions about the health benefits of these products. Sweeteners are everywhere, from beverages to salad dressing, from cookies to yogurt, and we must recognize that there is no guarantee that these chemicals won’t increase the burden of metabolic diseases in the future.